Different Instructions for the Same Steroid

If things weren’t confusing or muddled enough, it has come to my attention that a steroid can have different recommendations in different countries. The steroid is the same and yet guidelines are blatantly different.

Let’s take Diprosone for example. This is a Betamethasone Dipropionate topical steroid.

In the UK, it states:

  • Do not use on any other skin problem as it could make it worse especially rosacea (a skin condition affecting the face), acne, dermatitis (skin inflammation) around the mouth, genital itching, nappy rash, cold sores, chickenpox, shingles or other skin infections. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure.
  • Talk to your doctor or pharmacist before using diprosone ointment. This medicine should not be used under bandages or plasters.
  • Side effects that may happen with oral or injectables corticosteroids may also occur with corticosteroids used on the skin, especially in infants and children.
  • If the ointment is used more often than it should, or more than prescribed, it can affect some of your child’s hormones. This may affect their growth and development.
  • If Diprosone Ointment is used in children, it should not be used on any part of their body for more than 5 days.
  • Do not put the ointment under your child’s nappy, as this makes it easier for the active ingredient of the medicine to pass through the skin and possibly cause some unwanted effects.
  • Usually for adults and children, a thin layer of Diprosone Ointment should be rubbed into the affected area of skin twice a day.
  • Do not use the ointment on your face for more than 5 days.
  • Do not use a large amount of ointment on large areas of the body, open wounds or areas of the body where joints bend for a long time (for example every day for many weeks or months).
  • Most people find that when the ointment is used correctly, it does not cause any problems. However, if you use the ointment more than you should, particularly on your face, it can cause redness, stinging, blistering, peeling, swelling, itching, burning, skin rash, dryness of the skin, in the skin, inflammation of the hair follicles; excessive hair growth, reduced skin pigmentation; allergic skin reactions; dermatitis (skin inflammation); other skin infections, thinning of the skin and red marks.

In Australia, it states:

  • Do not use Diprosone if you have:

a viral skin infection, such as cold sores, shingles or chicken pox, a fungal skin infection, such as thrush, tinea or ringworm, tuberculosis of the skin, acne rosacea, inflammation around the mouth, skin conditions with ulcers,

Unless your doctor tells you.

(^^^^^^^ That seems unbelievably risky).

  • Do not use Diprosone just before having a bath, shower or going swimming.
  • Tell your doctor if: you are pregnant or breast feeding.
    Your doctor will tell you if you can use Diprosone during pregnancy or while you are breast feeding.

(^^^^^ again, whatever your doctor tells you? Why can’t the pamphlet tell me? Or is it that nobody knows and everyone is just guessing…)

  • Apply a thin film of Diprosone Cream or Ointment or a few drops of Diprosone Lotion to the affected skin or scalp twice daily. Massage gently until it disappears. For some patients, once daily application may be enough for maintenance therapy.
  • It is important to use Diprosone exactly as your doctor has told you.

(^^^^^ What if they tell you to go against the guidelines?)

  • Do not use Diprosone for more than four weeks at a time unless your doctor tells you.

(^^^^^^ And here is my point!)

  • Do not use Diprosone under dressings or on large areas of skin unless your doctor tells you

In the UK pamphlet, it says you should not use steroids on an infection site, even though the AU pamphlet says you can do it if your doctor instructs you to do so.

In the UK pamphlet, it says you should not use this steroid under occlusion, yet the AU pamphlet says it is ok if the doctor tells you to do so.

In the UK pamphlet, there doesn’t seem to be a set time recommendation to use the steroid (except for children and for the face), while the AU pamphlet says to use it no longer than 4 weeks unless your doctor says to do so, but doesn’t say how long to use it on the face.

In both pamphlets, it seems to leave pregnant women under the discretion of their doctor or their pharmacist.

Over and over in these pamphlets, there seems to be a lot of “just ask your doctor” or “unless prescribed by your doctor”. What happened to facts? What happened to “these are the guidelines and they need to be adhered to for the patient’s safety”? Moreover, there are doctors who get paid to prescribe certain drugs to patients, so where is the ethical line? Want to check out your doctor? Dollars for Docs

Also, RSS is not a side effect listed. It never is and should be. Red Skin Syndrome is not just a small symptom or side effect that will go away very quickly. This condition affects so much more than just your skin!

Doctors should also be educating their patients about steroid use, the good and the bad, as well as staying up to date with medical findings and research. Even a well meaning doctor can over prescribe this medication so it is pertinent that you know all there is about topical steroids before you begin use.

 

Author: preventabledoc

Director/Producer of Preventable: Protecting Our Largest Organ and Red Skin Syndrome advocate

One thought on “Different Instructions for the Same Steroid”

  1. Hey Brianna as a UK based sufferer I can confirm that all that info is incuded with the TS’s and v useful it is too. However, my derm gave me instructions that differed from the leaflet and i went with what I was told, trusting that they knew best. GAH!!! Thank you so much for your work to raise awareness of this awful and very preventable illness.

    Like

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