Topical Steroid Label Part II

Class 1 steroids, like Clobetasol Propionate, will always be the ones you see in studies showing bigger problems than less potent classes. However, that does not mean less point steroids are super safe.

So, I looked up the insert for the steroid I used, Alclometasone Dipropionate, which is a Class 6 steroid (Classes range from 1-7, 1 being the highest).

“May be used in patients 1 year of age and older, although safety efficacy of drug use for longer than 3 weeks have not been established.”

Not…. been… established. That translates into “we don’t know anymore after 3 weeks.” Also, it should NOT be used in children under 1 year old (although my personal belief is to steer clear of steroids on newborn skin).

The insert says to apply 2-3 times daily. We still see wavering views on this subject, some research showing putting on steroids creams more than once a day does not increase the likelihood of it working, but actually just increases your chances of overusing. Source

“If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassessment of diagnosis may be necessary.” This doesn’t say “if this isn’t working we will just give you more potent steroids,” it states that there my need to be a reevaluation. Speak to your doctor about such matters because it is unbelievably important that you are diagnosed correctly. Perhaps you need a swab done to see if you have an infection? Or perhaps you are allergic to something inside the medication, or to a chemical or food you are use.

“In another study, Aclovate (alclometasone dipropionate) was applied to 80% of the body surface of a normal subjects twice daily for 21 days (3 weeks) with daily, 12 hour periods of whole body occlusion.” The HPA axis decreased 10% in these patients. This is a Class 6, mildly potent steroid, and within 3 weeks there was HPA axis suppression. First, 80% is almost full body, and some doctors will tell you to do that. Secondly, what is a normal subject? Someone with healthy skin? If so, someone with eczema will be even worse off since our skin barrier is damaged. Source

One of my favorite quotes is, “Topically applied Aclovate cream and ointment can be absorbed in sufficient amounts to produce systemic effects.” There is that word again: systemic. This Class 6, mildly potent steroid, can start affecting our adrenal glands. If a doctor says this isn’t true, hand them an insert.

This insert also says the same thing as Clobetasol Propionate regarding child toxicity and infection warnings. It also specified that it should not be used on diaper dermatitis.

“The following local adverse reactions have been reported…”

Who reports this? I never have. Where are these reports being made, or sent? Who sends them? Patients? Doctors? I know when I’ve stated adverse affects I’ve been told I was wrong by a doctor, so I know they weren’t reporting what I saw. I can only imagine that the list given is much smaller and/or incorrect due to lack of reporting.

But, check this out, you CAN do something: REPORT YOUR ADVERSE EFFECTS

Overall, there seems to be many unclear and unknown scientific facts about this steroid (most likely for all, but I can’t speak fairly on that since I have not read every single insert). Are we as patients supposed to be fine about this? When doctors tell us they are perfectly safe when we have concerns and see adverse affects, what evidence do they possess?

More research, management, and reporting must be done for the safety of patients.

Author: preventabledoc

Director/Producer of Preventable: Protecting Our Largest Organ and Red Skin Syndrome advocate

One thought on “Topical Steroid Label Part II”

  1. The UK Yellow Card scheme provides a way for anyone to report adverse side effects they notice from medication – patients included.

    Many other countries have similar schemes. The data collected is reported publicly in the UK scheme. From what I remember, the numbers for ts was relatively low, therefore hasn’t triggered further action yet.

    The schemes also ask for you to be precise on the medication you are reporting – so don’t think there is a broad ts category but sub categories depending on type ( potency) of ts.

    From time to time posters on the tsw forums suggest reporting adverse side effects to the relevant agency in your country if you haven’t already done so.

    Like

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