The possible irreversible effects of antibiotics

We focus a lot on how chronic use of steroids can cause much damage to our body, inside and out. There are actually many drugs that can do this. One drug that most of us end up using (because of Red Skin Syndrome) is antibiotics. What many don’t know is that this drug can also cause much harm.

At first, some get very defensive on this subject because, if you are told you need antibiotics, you must need them for a reason. Many of us get staph on our skin and are immediately prescribed this drug to help. But we must take into consideration the pros and cons of this drug, not just on ourselves but others.

I think people see their own use of antibiotics as a solo consequence. That if they wish to use them as much as they want then they are the only ones who will suffer the consequences. However, that is not the case. If people begin to overuse this drug, it can change the microflora for the next generation. It is a domino effect that can change the world.

This is a very serious problem when it comes to newborns. One doctor, Martin Blaser, has been vital in this research and whom highlighted his immense concern for babies born from either C-seciton or from mothers who were given antibiotics during the pregnancy. These babies could have an insufficient amount of friendly guy flora, leaving them susceptible to health conditions and problems.

These health problems are often autoimmune related. Even just a one-time intravenous dose of antibiotics can alter our gut flora.

An unbalanced microbiota in the gut is also a contributing factor in autoimmunity. (13) Infection with certain microbial pathogens can trigger autoimmune reactions in joints and other organs. (14) The destruction of healthy gut flora can make the mucosal lining more susceptible to leakage, which some researchers believe is a precondition for developing autoimmunity. (1516) It is well-established that the balance of gut bacteria plays a key role in the formation of a proper immune response. (1718) A lack of healthy gut bacteria is associated with allergies, IBD, and general autoimmune reactions when this immune modulation goes awry.

Now, there are certain situations where we do need antibiotics. We can not always shy away from their services. But there are things we can do to help ourselves out.

Though antibiotics may be necessary in certain situations, it’s important to weigh the benefits of using them with the potential risks that may come from the permanent alteration of the gut flora. If antibiotics must be used (and there are certainly situations where this is the case), special care should be taken to not only restore their gut flora using probiotic foods and supplements, but to eat a diet that supports healthy gut microbiota with plenty of fermentable fibers from starch and the removal of food toxins.

For those instances where we can forgo oral antibiotics, there are other alternatives we can use to help us. You can find these alternatives here: Mark Sisson

We need to truly keep our minds open to these alternatives instead of jumping right into using antibiotics. Much like steroids, they can really hinder our health. And imagine using both at the same time for long periods of time. It can reek absolute havoc on our bodies.

Chris Kresser: High Price of Antibiotics

 

 

Why are we seeing the body as parts instead of as a whole?

I feel Chris Kresser said it best:

“In conventional medicine, there’s a doctor for each different body part, and so if you have heart disease and you have eczema, you go see the cardiologist for heart disease, you see the dermatologist for eczema, maybe you see an immunologist if you have an autoimmune disease, and all of these things are being looked at as separate conditions. As a patient, it can be pretty bewildering to just have this idea that you have all of these kind of separate and disconnected things happening and not to have an idea that there might be a common root cause that’s driving all of these pathologies. Of course, what that means is if there is a common root cause, then there’s a possibility of intervening at that level and seeing an improvement across the board in all of these conditions instead of trying to address each of them in a kind of silo fashion with specific drugs and things for each condition.” (CHRIS KRESSER PODCAST)

Now a days, when something is wrong and it’s pinpointed to a certain part of the body, we are referred to a specialist. This doctors specifically sees patients with one particular problem or problem area. It’s absolutely wonderful to have doctors well versed in one particular area of study, but why is it that when we speak of one problem in our body, that it is never thought to be connected to us as a whole? We are one huge machine.

When doctors now speak about the gut, and how so many other issues in the body arise from our gut not functioning properly, it makes absolute sense! Where do we get our energy? Food. Where does the food go? Into our mouths and down into our stomach and intestines and colon to get digested. Where do we get our nutrients from? Digesting the food! If we are eating foods that are creating a major imbalance in our digestive system, then we aren’t getting the proper fuel we need to function, which in turn can disrupt a slew of organs in our body. It can affect our brain, our eyes, our motor function, our muscle growth, our hormone levels and moods, our bone density, our blood circulation, and for us sufferers, our skin!

My biggest concern with modern medicine is the fact that it masks these problems. I recently watched a commercial for a pharmaceutical medication for helping lower cholesterol. This 1 minute segment was horrifyingly riddleddddd with side effects, including DEATH. Why on earth do we accept this form of treatment? Because it’s easier than changing our diet? That is the craziest excuse out there! We would rather risk death than yielding from a 3x a week McDonalds run?

This is where our solution lies! I will never bash steroids, be it orally, injection, or topically, because they are truly important in the medical community. However, what I can not and will not stand for any longer is the chronic use of this drug as a first line treatment for conditions that NEED to be better evaluated first because, chances are, patients don’t even need the steroids!! If you’re going into anaphylactic shock, of course take a steroid!! But, if you have eczema and you go into a doctor’s office and the first thing they do is write you a prescription for a steroid without evaluating it further… absolutely wrong (in my opinion). That is fast food service. You are receiving the McDonald’s $1 value menu treatment, and that is what is hurting so many around the world from ACTUALLY getting better.

Now, are there conditions that sadly may need chronic bursts of steroids? Yes there are. BUT, we should be finding alternative ways to help maintain a better balance for these conditions than subject innocent patients to the severe consequences that taking steroids chronically has on the body.


If we start looking at our body as a whole, instead of our problems being directed by the area they are located, we may start to see some real change in our world. And when it comes to Red Skin Syndrome prevention, this is VITAL! Taking the time to find out what is truly wrong with your skin, which may be actually stemming from gut issues, can save you so much pain and suffering. I would much rather give up dairy, or wheat, or fast foods (or all three if needed!) if that meant living a life that wasn’t constantly bombarded with skin concerns and anxiety for having to deal with them on a daily basis.

Are we perfect? No. It’s not always easy to eat optimally every single day of our lives (goodness, Christmas is upon us!), but we can make an extremely conscious effort to do it everyday. It’s important to stick to the diet that works for you 100% of the time, but give yourself credit.

Find a doctor who is willing to work with you, as an individual human being, and who cares about finding out what will work for you. They will take the time to dissect you from the inside out to pinpoint what is causing you harm AND help you live your life to it’s highest potential. No one deserves fast food treatment, especially if it leads to something as devastating as Red Skin Syndrome.

 

Depression Reversal

Ever thought about our stomachs affecting our thoughts and emotions?

“There is a huge and growing everyday body of evidence connecting the health of the gut to the health of the brain. In fact, there’s a saying in functional medicine, fire in the gut, fire in the brain, which means that if you have inflammation, parasites, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, fungal overgrowth, or dysbiosis in the gut, then that is going to produce an inflammatory response that in turn affects the brain and can cause inflammation and a whole bunch of other problems in the brain, and this is not a fringe theory at this point. It’s true that unfortunately not a lot of primary care doctors or even psychologists or psychiatrists are aware of this connection, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t well established in the scientific literature. It absolutely is. And in fact, it’s been known for almost a hundred years going back to some research that was done at Duke in the early 1930s and 1920s connecting the gut and the brain and even the skin in this axis—the gut–brain–skin axis, which I’ve written and spoken about before.”

This podcast goes into a lot of detail about how inflammation, anywhere in the body, can affect our minds (the frontal cortex).

Also, Kresser talks about the HPA axis, or the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. If we’ve learned anything about topical steroid dependency, we know that overuse can lead to a suppression of the HPA axis. And then, add chronic, everyday stress to the situation, and you’ve got a system that is extremely overloaded.

The last big subject he touches on is deficiencies in the body that could be contributing to depression. If we are lacking in certain vitamins and aren’t using it optimally in the body (methylation issues) then it can be throwing our balance off.

I highly recommend this podcast if you wish to catch his more in depth explanations on depression and inflammation in the body. What we are eating and lacking in our diet could  the reason we are mentally suffering and struggling to get through certain situations.

Kresser Podcast on Anxiety

Different Atopics Podcast

Dr. Matthew Zirwas, an Ohio MD, gave a very poignant (albeit slightly arrogant) talk in Arizona this October about atopic dermatitis in adults and how he categorizes this condition in order to give the right treatment.

He starts off with saying he is able to fix 90% of his patients. About 1 out of 10 of his patients he just isn’t able to truly help. Perhaps they are those with Red Skin Syndrome?

He checks IgE levels to see just how atopic they are (and to help initiate compliance).

Overall, I don’t appreciate the way he spoke about patients (very condescending), and even stated he had no problem lying to patients to get compliance, but I do wish to write about his lecture because it had interesting points.

One of the first things he began to mention was how awful the mainstream treatment for atopic dermatitis is for patients, especially when it comes to topical steroids. Dr. Zirwas gave a scenario of what usually happened when he was a resident. His doctor would state,

“Here is your triamicilone ointment, use dove soap, wear cotton clothes, stay cool, don’t sweat too much, don’t shower too much, good luck.” And we should have said as they were walking out of the door, “you’re not going to get any better…”

He knew there needed to be a change. He wanted to help people actually get better. He said  that topical steroids actually make the skin barrier worse. It may seem to help the symptom in the short run but it’s not fixing the problem, it’s actually causing a problem. He uses the analogy of using prednisone on bacterial pneumonia. The patient will feel great 12 hours in, but then will die because the steroids will have allowed the infection to get worse.

“Topical Steroids is probably one of the worst imaginable things you could do. If you were going to say ‘What’s the worst thing you could do for atopic dermatitis, it would be topical steroids.”

Now, I am going to get a little scientific on you. He used A LOT of big words. The lecture was riddled with jargon.

Dr. Zirwas explained the role of filaggrin for our skin. It is what brings together cyto-skeletal proteins. So, he uses the analogy of a hollow brick or shell as your stratum corneum (the outer layer of skin), and the filaggrin is what hardens it so nothing harmful can get in. It then degrades it into amino acids (which is our natural moisturizing factor, acting as a retainer for moisture in the outer layer of skin). Furthermore, it is a source of urocanic acid (a UV absorber). For those of us who are deficient in filaggrin, we are susceptible to friction, dryness and scaling, and fissuring (cracking).

While explaining this, he concludes that we shouldn’t be calling our condition atopic dermatitis, but cutaneous barrier disfunction. The biggest problem is our broken skin barrier.

Normal skin is like a wet sponge, moist and flexible and hard to tear. Atopic skin is much like a dried out sponge that’s hard, dry, and cracks.

He moves on to the main topic of the lecture: his 4 categories and how to treat them.

When it comes to mild-to-moderate atopics, it’s usually just water and irritants penetrating into the skin. With severe atopics, it is usually proteins leaking into the skin. Finding out which proteins these are will help you understand which treatment will work.

Main Goal: 1) Improve Skin Barrier and 2) Reduce protein exposure

The 1st Category, which everyone fits in, is barrier disfunction. This means lichenification, xerotic, usually worse in winter, and dull red. Treatment: physiological moisturizers (Ceramid based moisturizers). He feels these are effective because they penetrate the stratum corneum (outer skin layer), into the keratinocytes, into the golgi, and helps create natural skin moisture.

Ceramide based products, like EpiCerum, take time. Dr. Zirwas says no one will see results overnight. They need at least a week for results.

Here is where I get a bit off with his method, but it’s his way…

He mixes clobetasol steroid solution in with the creams for patients. He tells them to take the 50mg solution and pour it into a tub of new CeraVe (found at your local drug store) and use that for a month, 2x a day. That is a super potent steroid. Why give someone THAT potent of a steroid, regardless that it is diluted? His reasoning is that he feels the physiological cream makes the steroid less harmful to the skin barrier. Is there scientific evidence for this? I have no idea. I wish there was. And I am not sure if he has them do it for more than a month. If it’s just a month, I can kind of calm down about it, but if he puts his patients on this for a while, then it worries me.

The rest of the treatment for your barrier is: Shower at least 2 times a day and put a physiological moisturizer on right after – use a shower filter – double rinse your laundry or use vinegar in the mix – and use DryerMax dyer balls. 

He also went into talking about how he feels ointments are not the best choice for topical steroids. His logic is that steroids are looking for the most oily environment. The more oil in our vehicle of choice (like an ointment), the less likely the steroid with leave and penetrate into the skin. So he sees it as ointment is the worst, then cream, then lotion, then solution is the best. I can see his logic in this, but I don’t know of any scientific research backing this. I know ointments are more occlusive, so I would think, no matter what, the steroid would penetrate.

Category 2: Airborne -type

Aesthetically, men have what Dr. Zirwas calls an ‘inverse t-shirt’ pattern. Everything under his shirt is fine, but all the rest of his skin exposed to the outside is not. And women usually have facial dermatitis. Also, these patients usually have asthma and bad itching at night time.

He feels these are the hardest to treat. The problems are protein ‘allergies’, such as dust mites, pollen, ragweed, etc. These allergins are protease, which means they cause itch and worsening of the condition. These are the TH2 and TH17 triggers (which, when imbalanced, cause issues).

His Treatment: Mattress and pillow case covers (keeps the dust mite poop down) – washing at least twice a day, women washing their face as much as they can (and then putting on physiological moisturizers)

Category 3: malassezia driven

It affects the head and neck area. Usually they have eczema as children, but then into adulthood, it gets bad on their face.

This is his favorite type to treat since it’s easiest to him.

His Treatment: Itraconazole (check LFTs — which is liver function) 100mg 2x a day for 2 months, and ??? on weekends 100mg a day (literally could not understand what he said) – or- Ketoconazole (always check LFTs). He feels the former drug is safer than the latter, and feels orals must be used, not anti fungal creams.

Category 4: staph driven

It usually looks like moist atopic dermatitis with fissuring, crusting, and scabbing. Fairly bad eczema but it explodes/flares

He says he doesn’t swab (which made me angry) because he feels most of the time it isn’t MRSA so he doesn’t need to check. Well, I had MRSA on my skin in Month 8 of my withdrawal. If he hadn’t swabbed me, then I would still have had MRSA.

He says there hasn’t been a decent research article written about this. He also touched on antibiotic resistance and how we will be screwed possibly down the road.

His treatment: Keflix, Doxycycline or Bactrim for 4 weeks – Rifampin for 1 week in the beginning paired with one of three above (says it’s for decolonization) – Bleach bath once a week with clean towels, PJs, and sheets – Antibacterial washes (he likes Dial moisturizing antibacterial body wash) – avoid ointments (since he said most are contaminated with bacteria) – Neosporin 1 week per month on nostrils

Also, another reason for staph- driven dermatitis is decreased cathelicidin production. That means Vit-D production. You need to take LARGE doses, about 4,000 units a day. He says a study says it’s safe to take that much. No idea where that study is, but you can try and find it.

After explaining all of the different categories, he goes into some of the other treatments he gives on top of these if the patients are really bad. Things like immunosuppressants (Cellcept, Cyclosporin, Methotrexate). He says he barely prescribes these things since he can usually get things under control with his normal treatments.

Overall, it was informative. His method of treatment interests me, but not so much the compound steroid with CeraVe. I wonder how these patients would fair without the use of the steroids and just the other elements of his treatment.

 

NEA Questions for TSA

“Although topical steroid addiction or red burning skin syndrome had been mentioned as possible side effects of topical steroids in a 2006 review article in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, no statement was made regarding this illness in the new guidelines (2014). This suggests that there are still controversies regarding this illness.”

This review, written in Japan by many dermatologists, brings up important points regarding TSA and how it is being discussed and misrepresented in the dermatology field.

The NEA, National Eczema Association, had many questions that these dermatologists answered truthfully.

1. How do you define steroid addiction?

The review went into a brief history of where the term “addiction” was first used (Burry, 1973), as well as other doctors whom researched this phenomenon. The conclusion: “TSA is the situation where skin develops more severe or diverse skin manifestations after the withdrawal from TCS than at preapplication.”

2. What are the clinical findings of steroid addiction?

They felt that clinical findings should be described separately before and after withdrawal. Before withdrawal, skin may be more uncomfortably itchy and show signs of the TCS (topical corticosteroid) not working as well as before. “Dermatologists often explain pruigo as a chornic and difficult-to-treat type of eruption seen in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, it is often a sign of addiction.”

After withdrawal, the initial erythema often spreads to other areas day by day. This eruption also spreads to places where topical steroid use may not have been used. There is a range of cases, spanning from mild to severe. After the initial rebound period, the next phase is usually dry and itchy with thickened skin. “The addicted skin becomes normal as time passes, and the increased sensitivity after withdrawal decreases. The entire course can take from weeks to even years.”

3. What do the skin lesions look like, and how are they different to eczema?

They said that TSA skin lesions look similar or resemble the original skin disease. I somewhat disagree since the only way I knew I was addicted was because the eczema wasn’t the same anymore, however normal eczema and TSA do share many similarities.

The usual distribution of atopic dermatitis is the neck, knees, elbows or flexor parts of our body. With TSA, it can be present anywhere on the body. Also, after withdrawal, the skin becomes thickened.

4. Where on the body does it occur?

“Addiction can affect every part of the body.”

5. What strength of steroid and usage pattern leads to steroid addiction?

“What seems accurate is that longer periods of application and more potent strength of TCS lead to more frequent addiction. Concrete data is very difficult to obtain because patients usually do not have a record of the applied TCS.” Not only that, but if this is not recognized, how do we obtain accurate information?

From their understanding and their own experiment (seen at bottom), they were able to reasonably attest that TCS should not be used for more than 2 weeks. They also state that using topical steroids on and off intermittently doesn’t necessarily prevent addiction. There isn’t enough evidence to prove either side.

6. How is steroid addiction treated?

“It goes without saying that TCS must be withdrawn in addiction patients.”

They articulate that dermatologists usually misdiagnose this as an aggravation of the original eczema and prescribe potent steroids and insist that TCS never suppresses the HPA axis. As I’ve shown in Topical Steroid Label Part I and II, that is simply not true.

They also state that, paradoxically, they feel systemic steroids may help during the rebound period. I am not sure where this evidence is based since I, myself, tapered twice with oral steroids only to flare badly once tapered off.

There is also a discussion of how patients may not be able to taper their topical steroids. “Conversely, there are sufferers who cannot decrease the amount or potency of their TCS at all because they experience rebound immediately if the medication is decreased.”

7. How common is steroid addiction syndrome?

They are open and say there are no statistics regarding the prevalence. As I said earlier, how are we to know this information if the syndrome is commonly misdiagnosed? However, they did their own study over 6 months. It showed there were about 12% of their subjects who were addicted, which left a proportion of 88% not addicted. They make the very shrewd acknowledgement that “… we should not pass over the fact that the remaining 88% are also potentially addicted patients.”

Now, the review closes on three important problems seen in the new AAD guidelines regarding the viewpoint of how to prevent TSA.

One, the proactive approach discussed in the guidelines leaves little room for the eczema to heal on its own as shown in some children and infants. Proactively, you would use the steroid 1-2 times a week, while reactively you’d use it only when you have a flare. If you are continually using the steroid, regardless of showing signs of eczema, it tells the story that eczema sufferers will always need TCS. This approach does not help initially uncontrolled patients, in whom patients with TSA would most likely be included.

Two, the use of tachyphylaxis for the term TSA is not correct. It does not appropriately represent TSA because “tachyphylaxis is usually used to faster-onset responses than TSA,” and can be misguiding. Many TSA sufferers may not go to see a dermatologist anymore, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist. If these two terms are mixed up, it shows the fact that most dermatologists have not experienced seeing patients during withdrawal for TCS.

And third, the topic of under treatment. If someone has TSA, then steroid use must be stopped and cannot be seen as an under treatment and therefore they need more steroids. This does not help TSA patients.

And many questions are raised because of this — “Did the number of patients with adulthood atopic dermatitis increase after dermatologists began to prescribe TCS several decades ago? Why do patients with atopic dermatitis only complain or worry regarding TCS use? Until dermatologists can clearly answer these questions, patients with atopic dermatitis have a reasonable right to choose their own therapy after receiving sufficient medical information to make an informed decision.”

And, in my experience, that sufficient medical information is rarely available. Having excessive warnings about under treatment may overstep a patient’s right to choose the treatment they wish to use by inducing a prejudice that they aren’t wanting to treat their condition correctly.

Screen Shot 2016-09-04 at 12.45.18 PM
Above pic: normal, healthy skin before TS use; Below: 2 weeks after TS use (.05% clobetasol propionate, twice a day)

Review: Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis – Mototsugu Fukaya

FDA Reporting: Adverse Effects

Want to report adverse side effects? You don’t need to wait for your doctor. In fact, with Red Skin Syndrome, many adverse effects aren’t getting reported.

So let’s be proactive.

Visit the Food and Drug Administration page: FDA WEBSITE.

I apologize for this is only an American site, but others out of the country may be able to find your own government page to report adverse effects.

The papers you should fill out are the Consumer Voluntary Reporting Form

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When you go to mail or fax the pages, you can also attach a picture of the product you are reporting. Do not physically send them your product, but keep it in case they want to contact you for more information.

The FDA will reply to you so you know that your paperwork was received.

You want to fill out Sections A, B, D and E. Don’t worry if you aren’t able to answer every single question. Just fill it out as best you can.

Also, the FDA have the ability to share your name and contact information with the company that produced your product. If you want your information private, make sure to check the box in Section E.

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Any questions, you can call their toll free number, 1-800-332-1088

Once the forms are complete, mail them to:

MedWatch, Food & Drug Administration 

5600 Fishers Lane

Rockville, MD 20857

If you’d rather fax, the toll free number is, 800- 332- 0178

Good luck, guys! Let your voices be heard! 

Prescription Without A Cause

It’s not the steroid itself I have a problem with in the medical community. No. It is the overprescription & the lack of detective work to see if the patient even NEEDS the steroid that can cause so much harm when abused. That is what I have a problem with…

Take this dentist for instance. Here is the article that surfaced about his intense struggle with facial eczema.

Link to full article about Dr. Frances Tavares 

This dentist, Dr. Frances Tavares, was not only misdiagnosed and mistreated, but then had to deal with Red Skin Syndrome because of his overprescription of topical steroids (on his face no less). We already know that the face is one of the most sensitive areas/high absorption spots on the body. To use topical steroids on the face is already a risk, but then for such a long period of time is extremely neglectful.

After countless different dermatologists giving him different brands of topical steroids, Dr. Tavares was finally allergy tested 2 YEARS after first being seen. That is an obscene amount of time for a dermatologist to wait when the patient is not responding well to the steroid. It even says on topical steroid inserts that doctors should reassess the situation if it doesn’t get better (… not 2 years later).

After he had the allergy test, he found out he had an allergy to propylene glycol, which is commonly found in lotions, toothpaste and other body care products. By getting rid of products with this ingredient, he was fine. Or was he?…

No, he wasn’t. He had to withdrawal from the topical steroids that he had been using for so long because dermatologists didn’t take the time to properly diagnosis him. If they found the root cause to begin with, there would not have been any need for steroids.

And the biggest problem I find about this article is the emphasis they put on tapering, as if to say tapering solves all your problems. There are many Red Skin Syndrome sufferers who have tapered down, just as their doctors have prescribed, and still flare badly. Could it help with adrenal fatigue? Sure, I can see that if they need it for their adrenals. But to say they will be fine once they taper is not accurate.

“The doctor who diagnosed Tavares’ allergy says there’s no problem with the prescription of corticosteroids, but it is a mistake for patients to come off them cold turkey.”

Yes, yes there is a problem. No, I am not a doctor, but YES there is a problem. These topical steroids should not be prescribed for long periods of time, especially not on the face. It is not only neglectful but shows a lack of education on the topic of steroids.

So, I beg of you. If you have a rash come up, anywhere, get it tested (allergy and or swabbed for infection) before you start slathering on topical steroids as a solution. They are not meant for a long term solution.