NYC Mount Sinai Integrative Medicine Conference

New York City is one of my favorite places, so when I was informed by Henry Erlich that this conference was being held in the Big Apple, there was no hesitation in buying a plane ticket.

The conference was this past weekend, May 13th-14th. I was only able to attend the primary day. However there was plenty of information to be absorbed. My main reason for going was to hear the prestigious and awe-inspiring Dr. Xiu-Min Li spill her knowledge on allergic disease, ASHMI, and her take on Red Skin Syndrome. She will be one of the doctors I humbly get to interview for the documentary this summer, and I am stoked! Such an amazing woman whose research I know will change the way we treat eczema in the next decade. I see a Nobel Prize in her future.

Dr. Li has a phenomenal opportunity while working at Mount Sinai, bringing together both Western and Eastern medicine in a clinical setting. No Western doctor will be able to deny her results and her rigorous efforts to show how wonderful Traditional Chinese Medicine can be (and is!) for our growing allergy and eczema problems.

Besides Dr. Li, there were a plethora of doctors participating, some even flying all the way from China. We had headphones and a translator present in order to understand everyone speaking.

At the bottom, I will be posting a video of Dr. Li’s talk and all that I was able to film. Sadly, I was told we couldn’t video anything so I wasn’t prepared. It was only very late the night before that I was told I was misinformed. I did my best filming with my heavy camera and old phone while trying to listen. It’s a bit shaky, so I apologize. It had been down pouring that day, which soaked my shoes, so most of the conference I was bare foot, attempting to sit on my feet in hopes of warming them up in that already frigid auditorium room.

But here are a few highlights from the conference:

1st Speaker: Susan Weissman

Her son, Eden, had horrific allergies, asthma, and skin problems. She found Western medicine was not helping their son improve. She is an avid promoter of Dr. Li’s work and is happy to say her son is finally able to enjoy life because of her protocol. She is the author of Feeding Eden, a memoir about raising Eden with all of his serious health problems. I think the most profound thing she mentioned was her question to Western medicine doctors: “How do we treat the entity of allergic disease?” Medicine seems to be extremely narrow-minded instead of looking at the body (or a condition) as a whole.

2nd Speaker: Dr. Xiu-Min Li

She gave a brief oration before her longer one at the end of the conference. The merit of her work is astounding and she emphasized how necessary it was to be able to show how TCM brings results that Western doctors can believe in and not have them be able to dispute them as “false” or “not supported.” All of her work has to be proven through science.

4th Speaker: Shi-Ming Jin, MS

*Apologies since I skip over a few speakers*  I loved how she spoke about how the integrative world is striving to be more innovative and adaptive to Western world medicine in hopes of showing how TCM is helpful and important in giving patients relief.

8th Speaker: Jing Li, PhD, FDA Botanical Review Team

Basically, there are FDA guidelines/guidance for using botanicals (herbs) in medicine. They are tested in clinical trials just the same as Western medicine, so they are treated equally. It can not be written off. A demonstration of quality control was given, and how they wish to minimize any chemical, biological and pharmacological variations to obtain consistent drug substances.

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10th Speaker: Ke Xing Sun

He gave a speech about how using TCM is about keeping harmony in health with our whole body working together as a unit. We are individual people with individual needs, something Western medicine does not always provide. We should be more patient-centered with medicine. He also advocated health in daily life, reiterating how prevention is key.

11th Speaker: Arya Neilson, PhD

*She was a stellar speaker* She deals with acupuncture and the benefits it can give to certain patients, even those with eczema. One of the most interesting things was how this type of treatment post-surgery can help with opiod sparing since we, in the US, take up the vast percentage of opiod use around the globe. Opiod abuse it sky high and having this available is quite a remarkable treatment. Acupuncture is now even included by Western doctors in some therapies! When it comes to allergies and eczema, there was a study done to show how dust mite IgE levels were down regulated after using acupuncture, and how itching was reduced in eczema patients. However, acupuncture is more of a rescue therapy for patients and herbs should come first in eczema treatment. (She is featured on the video)

12th Speaker: Scott Sicherer, MD

He spoke eloquently about his field in allergy/immunology in babies and what could be causing such an exponential climb in allergies these past few decades. No one is for certain, but he feels having exposure to the skin could be a factor. For some reason, there has been found to be peanut dust inside of homes, which is where skin contact could become an issue. If babies have eczema, they are at a higher risk for allergies. He would use oral immunotherapy to try and desensitize the allergy, hoping to eradicate or raise the threshold. Scott touched upon using biologics (omalizumab) for some cases for 20-22 weeks (it’s an anti-IgE), but he says it doesn’t mean it’s going to be any more effective (just perhaps speeds the process).

14th Speaker: Rachel Miller, MD

Rachel continued to speak on allergies and issues in infants and children, focusing a bit on pregnant woman. She showcased how if a pregnant woman is under stress, her child is more likely to have wheezing. She also explained how methylation and DNA does play a role in some of these areas and how Dr. Xui-Min Li’s protocol, ASHMI, has shown good results in pregnant mothers.

16th Speaker: Anna Nowak-Wegryzn, MD

She gave a very in-depth speech about allergies and infant treatment. When she mentioned starting oral tolerance as early as 1 year old, a question popped into my mind. If we can detect and start to treat allergies at that age, why is it that Western doctors are so quick to lather steroids on a baby, but claim they can not test for allergies until about 3 years old? That’s something that I feel should be addressed. When it comes to peanut allergies, she said she personally thinks using boiled peanuts instead of baked are safer to use for desensitization without losing efficacy.

** Funny side note** Dr. Xiu-Min Li came up and asked a question during Q&A. She asked it in Chinese, and the speaker answered back in Chinese. Everyone asked what was said so Dr. Li offered to translate. She started to do the translation, but didn’t realize she was still speaking in Chinese, so someone stopped her. She didn’t realize she wasn’t speaking English. We all had a laugh.

18th Speaker: Julie Wang, MD

 She spoke about a drug trial (See pics below)

20th Speaker: Dr. Kamal Srivastava, PhD

One of his best and to the point notes was that IgE is central to the pathology of allergic disease. Another subject he touched on was FAHF-2, which is another herbal formula much like Dr. Li’s ASHMI. Berberine, an herb, is the most potent at reducing IgE levels, and can even help lower glucose. However, it is very badly absorbed taken orally, so they are trying to make it more effective (perhaps, adding to a molecule).

22nd Speaker: Dr. Ying Song, MD

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23rd Speaker: Anne Maitland, MD, PhD

She studies Mast Cell Activation Disorders. Anne used the Great Wall of China as an analogy, how it’s not always effective for keeping the bad out. Mast cells can release different things, like histamine or tryptase, and just like a police call, you want to send the correct team out to help for the correct situation. She also touches on how when we figured out how to decrease certain bacterial-based diseases (like Measles), hypersensitivity disorders increased (like allergies). Naps, apparently, are something we need more of to help with stress (which I totally agree!).

24th Speaker: Julia Wisniewski, MD

She spoke about our skin barrier and how we shouldn’t use alkaline soap on baby skin. The best thing she mentioned however was that at the latest AAD meeting, she saw a slide that said steroids do, in fact, have the ability to cause allergic reactions in patients. Near the end, she spoke about Vit D and how it’s definitely important for our bodies.

The last two speakers were Tiffany Camp Watson, the mother who gave her testament about using Dr. Li’s protocol, and then Dr. Xiu-Min Li herself! They are both on the YouTube video speaking. Most of the video is of Dr. Li speaking. After 6:30 mins, it is all Dr. Li and her presentation.


I hope this was informative and I can’t wait to have all my equipment in to shoot these upcoming interviews! 2.5 weeks to go!

ITSAN — Doctor Pages

As many may know, ITSAN.org is the non-profit organization that advocates to help fight against Red Skin Syndrome and stands as a refuge for those who are suffering and have no support. ITSAN stands for International Topical Steroid Addiction Network.

The team leaders, Joey VanDyke (President) and Kathy Tullos (Executive Director), have poured their heart and souls into this organization to help out everyone who is lost and weary while enduring this heartbreaking condition.

One way they give back is by making it as easy as possible for sufferers to advocate for themselves. These woman get paid hardly any money to do full time jobs in order to make this possible.

Kathy went above and beyond and created this detailed, incredibly informative page that we all can show to doctors in order to help them see that this condition is not only real, but should be taken very seriously.

DOCTORS PAGE

Please, use this page whenever you are trying to inform doctors of Red Skin Syndrome. Here is just some of the wisdom found on this page:

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This page should be utilized in every way to spread awareness.

FDA Reporting: Adverse Effects

Want to report adverse side effects? You don’t need to wait for your doctor. In fact, with Red Skin Syndrome, many adverse effects aren’t getting reported.

So let’s be proactive.

Visit the Food and Drug Administration page: FDA WEBSITE.

I apologize for this is only an American site, but others out of the country may be able to find your own government page to report adverse effects.

The papers you should fill out are the Consumer Voluntary Reporting Form

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When you go to mail or fax the pages, you can also attach a picture of the product you are reporting. Do not physically send them your product, but keep it in case they want to contact you for more information.

The FDA will reply to you so you know that your paperwork was received.

You want to fill out Sections A, B, D and E. Don’t worry if you aren’t able to answer every single question. Just fill it out as best you can.

Also, the FDA have the ability to share your name and contact information with the company that produced your product. If you want your information private, make sure to check the box in Section E.

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Any questions, you can call their toll free number, 1-800-332-1088

Once the forms are complete, mail them to:

MedWatch, Food & Drug Administration 

5600 Fishers Lane

Rockville, MD 20857

If you’d rather fax, the toll free number is, 800- 332- 0178

Good luck, guys! Let your voices be heard! 

Prescription Without A Cause

It’s not the steroid itself I have a problem with in the medical community. No. It is the overprescription & the lack of detective work to see if the patient even NEEDS the steroid that can cause so much harm when abused. That is what I have a problem with…

Take this dentist for instance. Here is the article that surfaced about his intense struggle with facial eczema.

Link to full article about Dr. Frances Tavares 

This dentist, Dr. Frances Tavares, was not only misdiagnosed and mistreated, but then had to deal with Red Skin Syndrome because of his overprescription of topical steroids (on his face no less). We already know that the face is one of the most sensitive areas/high absorption spots on the body. To use topical steroids on the face is already a risk, but then for such a long period of time is extremely neglectful.

After countless different dermatologists giving him different brands of topical steroids, Dr. Tavares was finally allergy tested 2 YEARS after first being seen. That is an obscene amount of time for a dermatologist to wait when the patient is not responding well to the steroid. It even says on topical steroid inserts that doctors should reassess the situation if it doesn’t get better (… not 2 years later).

After he had the allergy test, he found out he had an allergy to propylene glycol, which is commonly found in lotions, toothpaste and other body care products. By getting rid of products with this ingredient, he was fine. Or was he?…

No, he wasn’t. He had to withdrawal from the topical steroids that he had been using for so long because dermatologists didn’t take the time to properly diagnosis him. If they found the root cause to begin with, there would not have been any need for steroids.

And the biggest problem I find about this article is the emphasis they put on tapering, as if to say tapering solves all your problems. There are many Red Skin Syndrome sufferers who have tapered down, just as their doctors have prescribed, and still flare badly. Could it help with adrenal fatigue? Sure, I can see that if they need it for their adrenals. But to say they will be fine once they taper is not accurate.

“The doctor who diagnosed Tavares’ allergy says there’s no problem with the prescription of corticosteroids, but it is a mistake for patients to come off them cold turkey.”

Yes, yes there is a problem. No, I am not a doctor, but YES there is a problem. These topical steroids should not be prescribed for long periods of time, especially not on the face. It is not only neglectful but shows a lack of education on the topic of steroids.

So, I beg of you. If you have a rash come up, anywhere, get it tested (allergy and or swabbed for infection) before you start slathering on topical steroids as a solution. They are not meant for a long term solution.

Generic Brands: Are they really Equivalent?

When we are prescribed steroids, we sometimes choose to use the generic brand because it is cheaper. Why spend tons of money on the brand name if you can get the same cream for a lower price?

Well, we may need to rethink our bargain.

A study done in 1991 showed that not all off-brand topical steroid products hold up to their supposed counterpart.

From the abstract: “Six generic formulations of 5 topical steroids were compared for bioequivalence with their trade name counterparts using an in vivo vasoconstriction assay. Two of the six generic forms were found to show significantly less vasoconstriction then the respective trade-name topical steroids.”

Without even meaning to, you could be using a topical steroid that is less potent than the prescribed objective. I have not been able to find evidence that this has been rectified since the 1990’s. This is extremely troubling, something that needs attention if it is still an ongoing occurrence.

What is more discouraging is the fact that this relates to ALL generic drugs, not just to topical steroids.

In 2011, a Supreme court decision was made: If there is a side effect seen in a brand name drug, the company must place it on the label. However, the generic company is not under such law and does not have to share those findings on the label.

As explained by Dr. Roger Steinert in his article, Generic vs Brand-Name Drugs: An Ongoing Debate, he describes the fatal flaw of how generic drugs work. The FDA says that the generic brand must 1) use the same concentration of active ingredient as the brand name and 2) same route of administration as the brand name. However, they are not reviewed and are not as monitored as their brand name “counterpart”. This leaves an immense room for error.

So, next time you pick up that generic brand, remember what you are paying for. What a backwards world we live in…

 

Study From: A Double-Blind controlled comparison of generic and trade-name topical steroids using the vasoconstriction assay. Arch Dermatol. 1991;127(2):197-201. Olsen EA.

Topical Steroid Label Part II

Class 1 steroids, like Clobetasol Propionate, will always be the ones you see in studies showing bigger problems than less potent classes. However, that does not mean less point steroids are super safe.

So, I looked up the insert for the steroid I used, Alclometasone Dipropionate, which is a Class 6 steroid (Classes range from 1-7, 1 being the highest).

“May be used in patients 1 year of age and older, although safety efficacy of drug use for longer than 3 weeks have not been established.”

Not…. been… established. That translates into “we don’t know anymore after 3 weeks.” Also, it should NOT be used in children under 1 year old (although my personal belief is to steer clear of steroids on newborn skin).

The insert says to apply 2-3 times daily. We still see wavering views on this subject, some research showing putting on steroids creams more than once a day does not increase the likelihood of it working, but actually just increases your chances of overusing. Source

“If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassessment of diagnosis may be necessary.” This doesn’t say “if this isn’t working we will just give you more potent steroids,” it states that there my need to be a reevaluation. Speak to your doctor about such matters because it is unbelievably important that you are diagnosed correctly. Perhaps you need a swab done to see if you have an infection? Or perhaps you are allergic to something inside the medication, or to a chemical or food you are use.

“In another study, Aclovate (alclometasone dipropionate) was applied to 80% of the body surface of a normal subjects twice daily for 21 days (3 weeks) with daily, 12 hour periods of whole body occlusion.” The HPA axis decreased 10% in these patients. This is a Class 6, mildly potent steroid, and within 3 weeks there was HPA axis suppression. First, 80% is almost full body, and some doctors will tell you to do that. Secondly, what is a normal subject? Someone with healthy skin? If so, someone with eczema will be even worse off since our skin barrier is damaged. Source

One of my favorite quotes is, “Topically applied Aclovate cream and ointment can be absorbed in sufficient amounts to produce systemic effects.” There is that word again: systemic. This Class 6, mildly potent steroid, can start affecting our adrenal glands. If a doctor says this isn’t true, hand them an insert.

This insert also says the same thing as Clobetasol Propionate regarding child toxicity and infection warnings. It also specified that it should not be used on diaper dermatitis.

“The following local adverse reactions have been reported…”

Who reports this? I never have. Where are these reports being made, or sent? Who sends them? Patients? Doctors? I know when I’ve stated adverse affects I’ve been told I was wrong by a doctor, so I know they weren’t reporting what I saw. I can only imagine that the list given is much smaller and/or incorrect due to lack of reporting.

But, check this out, you CAN do something: REPORT YOUR ADVERSE EFFECTS

Overall, there seems to be many unclear and unknown scientific facts about this steroid (most likely for all, but I can’t speak fairly on that since I have not read every single insert). Are we as patients supposed to be fine about this? When doctors tell us they are perfectly safe when we have concerns and see adverse affects, what evidence do they possess?

More research, management, and reporting must be done for the safety of patients.

Not Just A Dermatology Subject

Dermatologists are not the only ones allowed to prescribe topical steroids. Other persons whom prescribe these drugs are general practitioners, our family doctor. However, they are not specialized in this area. We already know some dermatologists push past the guidelines, but GPs are even less educated on steroids and all of their adverse effects if overprescribed or prescribed incorrectly.

In the FDA Evaluation and Research paper, they point out how our GPs can be truly hurting us. “… family physicians frequently prescribed betamethasone dipropionate and clotrimazole to children younger than 5 years of age and for use on genital skin disorders.”

Not only should this super potent steroid be prescribed with utmost caution to adults, but then add an anti-fungal (clotrimazole) into the mix, and you’ve got mega trouble. NEVER mix antifungals with topical steroids, and never use a steroid on a fungal infection. It is also stated in topical steroid inserts to never use these topical steroids on the genitals since it is extremely sensitive and most likely under occlusion (diaper).

This paper also talks heavily about research they constructed from 202 cases. The median age was 7 years old, a mix of both genders, and drum roll…. A median of topical steroid use for 169.3 days. That comes out to a little over 5.5 months of consecutive use. The shortest time was 1 day, and the longest was 7 years. This is why people have steroid phobia from this type of disregard for topical steroid guidelines.

If doctors wish to have the trust of their patient, then patients need to see that doctors can be trusted. We are the ones who have to endure the consequences. We are the ones who will have to suffer. There has to be open and honest communication on a level playing field. So many lives can be saved from needless pain if topical steroids were not only used strictly by a guideline (NOT by someone’s discretion), but also to know that the guideline set is correct and appropriate.