Feature #11: Gabrielle & Hollie

gabrielle-guisewiteGabrielle Guisewite

Age: 23

Career: Unemployed due to TSW, I worked as a Front Desk Manager for an alternative medicine wellness center until 5 months TSW.

When did you cease using topical steroids: End of July 2015

What type did you use: fluocinonide, triamcinolone acetonide, hydrocortisone

What is your favorite product for comfort? As much as I hate using it, Aquaphor – I wish something natural worked better, but not yet.

What is the hardest thing to deal with during this condition? Not being able to look at myself in the mirror because of shame and disgust and pure fear that I would never look like me again. Being in pain and discomfort every single day, leading me down the long dark path of depression and being suicidal; hating your life to an entirely new level where you know you are no longer yourself. When you don’t complain about how you’re doing so others automatically assume you’re doing better, and when you complain too much others get annoyed or don’t really know what else to say to comfort you.

What is the first thing you are going to do when you are healed? TRAVEL, ENJOY LIFE & HELP OTHERS WHO ARE GOING THROUGH TSW! I am currently getting my Health Coaching certification (this is partially due to my TSW experience) and I hope to help prevent this debilitating disease while encouraging others who are going through the journey. I will never take life for granted again and will appreciate every single day in an entirely new light.


Hollie Dixonhollie-dixon

Age: 38

Career: Teacher and a server

When did you cease using topical steroids: May 20, 2014

What type did you use: I don’t know for sure. I know I used a lot of the mild strength creams for my face, then I used Clobetasol and Mometasone for a bit after the rash had started spreading around my body.

What is your favorite product for comfort? Vaseline and gauze and Cerave lotion

What is the hardest thing to deal with during this condition? The hardest part was the unknown and the loneliness. I also feel inadequate and like I’m not doing my job to the best of my ability. I feel like I’m robbing my students of an education. Waking up, if I was able to fall asleep, and feeling the pain and the itch immediately. From the second I opened my eyes, it began. From the second I woke up I started thinking, “I can’t do this today”. The mental struggle is harder than the physical. Every day I wonder how much longer can I go on, but in reality I don’t have many other options.

What is the first thing you are going to do when you are healed? The first thing I’m going to do when I’m healed is appreciate not being in pain. Appreciate everything around me. Waking up and getting ready to leave the house in 30 minutes. Showering. Getting in and out of the car easily. Not having dead skin surround me 24/7. Get a massage. I’m just going to live and appreciate life.

How is this Legitimate?

This is the abstract from a review done in Australia on the effects of TCS in children.

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“… and their unfounded concerns…” Ya, you read that right. I’m quite concerned as to what they deem unfounded?

“Contrary to popular perceptions, (TCS) use in pediatric eczema does not cause atrophy, hypopigmentation, hypertrichosis, osteoporosis, purpura or telangiectasia when used appropriately as per guidelines.”

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Link for above article

It is well known that using topical steroids on children should be used with extreme caution, and if parents have questions or concerns, they didn’t just suddenly make them up in their head. No, they have undoubtedly heard things (that are likely founded) and have every right to be concerned. Often times, children even outgrow eczema. If their case is mild, there is no reason to start lathering them in topical steroids (in my personal opinion). Babies get rashes and skin blemishes. If they aren’t bothering the child or aren’t severe, perhaps finding a more natural way to deal with their skin would be best before jumping onto steroids.

A problem I also have with the “use appropriately as per guidelines” sentence is that doctors often stray from the said guidelines. If the product says to only use the drug a certain way and the doctor’s discretion is different, then there is a huge problem. No amount of “don’t worry” or “it’s totally safe” will in actuality make it safe for you to go past the 2 to 4 week rule in children. And, the larger the surface area you are told to put the steroid, the higher the potential of adverse effects (you know, those “unfounded” ones).

To further my proof, you can read the FDA Evaluation and Research paper.

Founded by three different references, it states, “… HPA axis suppression has been observed in infants and children with both high potency and low potency topical corticosteroids.” Why on earth would you put a child at an even higher risk with potent steroids when they should only be placed on the least potent steroid first, of which they could still risk having side effects if used over the guideline mark? For example, this evaluation states Fluticasone (Class 5 steroid), is said to be approved for patients 3 months old and up for a maximum of 4 weeks. Other studies show an even shorter period of 2 weeks should be utilized. The potent and super potent steroids are Class 1 and 2.

The best part of this research paper: “… the labeling of each product should advise practitioners of the appropriate duration of use of the product. The labeling should give information regarding how quickly improvement in dermatoses should occur after therapy with topical corticosteroid is started, and practitioners should be advised to discontinue the product if improvement does not occur within this time frame.”

It doesn’t say if the steroid isn’t working, immediately up their potency. It says DISCONTINUE. They need to be reassessed.This is what is supposed to happen.